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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
MSNBCW 07/03/2013
Mitchell: Can you explain what you meant when you said there was not data collection on millions of Americans? Clapper: well, the -- first, as I said, I have great respect for senator Wyden. I thought in retrospect, I was asked when are you going to stop beating your wife kind of question, which is meaning not answerable necessarily by a simple yes or no. So I responded in what I thought was the most truthful or least untruthful manner by saying no.
Barton Gellman
Journalist, contributing to the Washington Post
MSNBCW 08/30/2013
Mitchell: you've detailed that it's $52.6 billion, 69% goes to the NSA, CIA and the National Reconnaissance Center. How have you assessed from all that you have been reporting here the value we're getting, the bang for the buck? What are we doing well and not so well? Gellman: Well they have some fairly frank internal report cards here. They talk about where they think
Andrea Mitchell
NBC Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent and Host of Andrea Mitchell Reports
MSNBCW 08/30/2013
Mitchell: one of the gaps is also Pakistan. We were always told, Oh, don’t worry we know the leadership in Pakistan has control of its weaponry and in fact, there was talk at the time during the Musharraf reign that there was a double key that they couldn't move things without us knowing about it. This seems to indicate that in later time frame, that there are real concerns about where the nukes are.
John Brennan
Director of the CIA
CSPAN 03/11/2014
Mitchell: She (Feinstein) says that there are potentially illegal and unconstitutional breaches by CIA. Brennan: Well there are appropriate authorities right now both inside of CIA as well as outside of CIA – Mitchell: Justice Department. Brennan: are looking at what CIA officers as well as SSCI staff members did. And I defer to them to determine whether or not there was any violation of law or principle. And I referred the matter myself to the CIA inspector general to make sure that he was able to look honestly and objective at what CIA did there. When the facts come out on this I think a lot of people who are claiming that there has been this tremendous, sort of spying and monitoring and hacking will be proved wrong.
John Brennan
Director of the CIA
CSPAN 03/11/2014
Mitchell: You said in your confirmation hearing you wanted to restore the trust between CIA and the overseers in the senate. This is a pretty major gulf. If it is proved that, that the CIA did do this, would you feel that you had to step down? Brennan: I am confident that the authorities will review this appropriately and I will deal with the facts as uncovered in the appropriate manner. I would just encourage some members of the senate to take their time to make sure that they don't overstate what they claim and what they probably believe to be the truth.
Edward Snowden
whistleblower
KNTV 05/30/2014
Mitchell: The NSA said Thursday it found only one e-mail from Snowden asking for clarification on a legal issue, not whistle-blowing. Asked to comment today Snowden responded to NBC news saying “The NSA's new discovery of written contact between me and its lawyers after more than a year of denying any such contact existed raises serious concerns. Calling the NSA release “incomplete,” Snowden added, “The fact is that I did raise such concerns both verbally and in writing and on multiple continuing occasions. As I've always said and as NSA has always denied.” Still the White House is challenging Snowden's credibility. Susan Rice: He was not trained as a spy. We have no idea where that assertion comes from. And has Edward Snowden done damage? He's done immense damage.
Edward Snowden
whistleblower
MSNBCW 05/30/2014
Mitchell: Edward Snowden is holding firm to his claim that he did blow the whistle about NSA abuses before the leaks leaving a paper trail to prove it. His interview with Brian Williams. Snowden: I voiced these complaints not just officially, in writing through e-mail, to these offices and these individuals, but to my supervisors, to my colleagues, in more than one office. Mitchell: Under pressure the NSA after a year released one e-mail, the sole e-mail it found from Snowden to NSA lawyers but Snowden has fired back about that release telling the "Washington Post" today the picture painted by the NSA is incomplete.
John Kerry
Secretary of State
MSNBCW 05/30/2014
Kerry: If this man is a patriot, he should stay in the United States and make his case. Patriots don't go to Russia. They don't seek asylum in Cuba. They don’t seek asylum in Venezuela. They fight their cause here. There are many a patriot. You can go back to the pentagon papers with Dan Ellsberg and others who stood and went to the court system of America and made their case. Edward Snowden is a coward, he is a traitor and he has betrayed his country and if he wants to come home tomorrow to face the music, he can do so. Mitchell: Well, today the famed Pentagon Papers whistleblower Dan Ellsberg and Co-Founder of The Freedom of The Press Foundation is sounding off about Kerry's comments. Daniel Ellsberg wrote a column that was posted in the Guardian.
Daniel Ellsberg
Author of
MSNBCW 05/30/2014
Mitchell: Tell me why you disagree with the argument that he should have stayed, gone through the chain of command and faced the music, that he should be willing to stand trial and defend himself. Ellsberg: There’s several parts to that. On the first, chain of command- Snowden had seen what had happened to every person who went through the chain of command in NSA. Highest officials in NSA, technical people, Bill Binney, Ed Loomis, Kirk Wiebe, Thom Drake, all of them had gone to the inspector general and for that had their careers ruined. Several resigned, all of them raided by the FBI and lost their computers on suspicion that they had given the truth of what they were saying to the IG, inspector general and to Congress about the NSA’s criminal listening in without a warrant on hundreds of millions of Americans. They had told that, but not to the press, as they should have.
Andrea Mitchell
NBC Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent and Host of Andrea Mitchell Reports
MSNBCW 05/30/2014
Mitchell: I want to ask you, one of the things that Snowden said is that he wouldn't be able to defend himself, he couldn't speak to his motivations because it would be ruled by a judge, as it was in your case, I think in that trial, that it be reviewed as not responsive or not relevant to describe why you took the Pentagon Papers or why he gathered these documents.
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